Ego: It Is What It Is

What is a “smart” phone? A device that makes one connect to the world or plastic and wires that send signals to communicate other devices? What is a painting? Art that elicits or recalls an emotional response connected to a memory or pigment (or some other medium) organized on a surface in a specific or random fashion? What about sex?! Euphoria or merely procreation in which human beings derive a form of pleasure from stimulated nerve endings in a particular region of the body?

It may serve one better to view things objectively as a foundation, then subjectively. Purely viewing from a subjective standpoint, creates massive forms of miscommunication. This symbol means this, that action means that. Until put into context, objects and situations are meaningless, which is to say, the meaning is placed on them by the ones observing or involved.

Accepting what is renders a more calm being as we stop trying to force (conflict) the world to conform to what we feel it should be. Life gets easier; situations become less stressful and people find it easier to deal with you.

Verbal communication has too many variables to cover in this article. Instead, we shall cover people’s actions. Actions communicate intent more clearly and can be objectively viewed with minimum confusion when viewed in context with enough information. In a relationship, one utters the words “I love you” conversely, their actions show otherwise (or they have a skewed understanding of what “love” is). Furthermore, what is love? The answer to all in the world or simply chemicals secreted from the brain when outside stimuli have been introduced to create attraction long enough for the two to procreate? The above may sound emotionless, nonetheless, the former is subjective and the latter objective.

Moreover, the point should be made, when handling business, remove all emotions and morals from the situation. When getting things done, one must always start with what is before we can look at what it can be. Many situations have nothing to do with what’s “right” and “wrong” as those terms or relative. One can argue righteousness all day, while this same person is probably having issues all the time due to this modus operandi. There is no “good,” “bad,” “right,” “wrong,” and/or “evil” until that connotation is placed on the object/situation by the person’s ideals. But what makes one’s morality “right” over another? The contrast here is what fuels most wars and conflicts.

In any event, we can place whatever meaning we want on anything, consequently the repercussions are frequently onerous. Try to view situations for what the are and stop fooling yourself. If one’s boy/girlfriend cheats, they did so for a reason. It wasn’t a “mistake” no matter what they say (read He’s Just Not That Into You). If one damages your car, they were not as scrupulous as they should have been, no matter what they say. If a government claims they’re there to help the people and that’s not being done, that’s not their goal no matter what they say. When one’s reality is closer to the reality, life becomes a lot more elated as what is has been accepted. Many can argue that reality is perception and bring a very spiritual viewpoint but this can be countered very easily. If that statement were true then all sciences would cease to exist. Yet, most live their lives based in science. The mere fact that this article is being read proves that. Conversely, there is a duality that is beyond this writing thus, I digress. “It is what it is” and that’s the way it will always be.

1st trustee

P.S. On the other hand, don’t use the term “It is what it is” as an excuse to avoid accountability as to why things happened. Many (cunning to whimsical) take this position to avert explanation of their actions (or lack there of), responsibility and a typical dismay. What that is, is laziness and a lack of responsibility.

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